Wednesday, 20 May 2009

Bad data leads to bad science...

...or as the IT people say "garbage in, garbage out". Another coup from Anthony Watts (WuWT), points out that historical temperature records across the USA may be a clear case of "garbage in"...more from the project website here...
...Billions of dollars are being spent on "fixing" the climate issue, but how much is invested in data collected to identify the problem? There has clearly been a warming trend over the last century, but by how many degrees? A new report published by meteorologist Anthony Watts draws into question the reliability of temperature data collected at over 1,200 sites across the country. These sites represent the U.S. Historical Climate Network (USHCN). Some of the surface stations have been collecting temperature data for over 100 years. Working with hundreds of volunteers, Watts has thoroughly documented the environment surrounding some 80 percent of surface stations from coast to coast, an effort never done before...
...According to the U.S. government, a surface station must be at least 100 feet away from a heat source/sink to be considered reliable. Using the goverment's own standards for properly locating temperature sensors, Watts graded each site on a scale from 1 to 5. A grade of 1 or 2 indicates reliable placement. A grade of 3 to 5 can result in temperature errors of several degrees, according to the governments own studies...more here...
...and from Jennifer Marohasy...ask a forest worker from Tasmania, a commercial fisherman from South Australia, a sugarcane grower from Queensland or a cattle producer from New South Wales what they think of Greens and a common complaint will be that “Greens tell lies”.
Each of these groups have been the target of clever campaigns by Green groups including The Wilderness Society and WWF Australia.
Tasmanian forest workers have put up committed and organised resistance and many of their truck and utilities sport bumper stickers with the comment
“Greens tell lies”. ...more here...

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